Tag Archives: A Cup of T

Creating Stories: Because Snapchat is Never Enough

The world had a lot of plans for 2017, but WhatsApp deciding that it needed its own version of Snapchat stories was not one of them.

The merits and demerits of this feature aside (I think we can all agree that while the update was made with good intentions, the removal of the original typed WhatsApp status was a poor decision, one that WhatsApp had to rectify due to the backlash.) – the temporary story making form is a growing trend. Instagram decided it needed it, WhatsApp brought it in, and even Facebook has its own version now.

Everyone is telling a story.

The era of peak TV has brought with it something else – the understanding that someone is always watching. We pose for the invisible camera that is our movie, and with the right filter it starts to look more and more like the epiphanic moment of romantic revelation coming closer. Of course, if one chooses to be part of another movie, the right filter can give you the tortured detective ideal that you need – with the fairy lights making your existence just a little bit more Peter Pan than whatever it had been before.

Democracy in literature has allowed us this right – we design ourselves, we make ourselves, we fashion who we are – and with the right filter, we can make our own movies. The constant storytelling is almost voyeuristic, since the designing of your self is in constant view. Everything, from the caption to the image, to the time limit and the words said – everything goes through a mental screening. And this process entails just one decision: who do you want to be today?

The tools which allow this constant self-fashioning can be examined further. What is the difference between the article you share on Facebook, the picture of your room on Instagram, or the written status you choose for WhatsApp? What does it say when you share a meme about what kind of humour you like, and on which platform it is allowed? How is it that on Snapchat – which is more exclusive, allowing you to decide who sees the story – captions can have swear words? Facebook, on the other hand, works as a more general platform where we avoid putting up anything our parents would disapprove of.

The differences between these platforms bring us to the issue of the performative part of our identity. We make ourselves for other people to see almost constantly, and the way we make ourselves changes with the group we interact with. There’s nothing inherently new about this. Every person changes depending on whom they speak to – but currently, this performance has become more defined, and caters to a larger audience. The way we fashion ourselves has increased with the sheer number of tools we have to do just this – because with every meme we post, we add to what people think of us.

The focus of literature and movies also shows the way this fashioning has changed. The democratisation of media has allowed almost anyone to imagine that they are part of this grand narrative – this movie, one with the right playlist, the right words, the right poetry, is theirs for the taking. We design our lives to look like these movies – the validity of unsaid experiences fades because, as in movies, the most hidden moments of a character’s progression are always part of the scene. Therefore, even moments of peaceful solitude are captured and shared, so that the experience becomes an interesting blend of your own performance and the constant feedback of your audience.

Everything becomes a story to be told. And in that we become stories – constantly read, and constantly needing an audience.

Cheers,

T in a Cup


tanviedit

A Cup of T
‘T’ as in me, ‘Cup’ as in tea, ‘Of’ as in preposition and ‘A’ as in article. Bringing you thoughtful rants on TV, books, society and various other things induced by too many cups of ice tea.

Written by Tanvi
Updates every fortnight


Column icon by Sanna Jain
Featured Image by Stuti Pachisia

The Secret Life of Fiction

Fanfiction.

It’s a word that puts off many people, and I felt it was prudent to begin the article by stating it outright. There is poetry in discussing exactly where stories go when the final word of the book is followed by the fullstop-of-finality. We all like imagining the spaces where our favourite characters disappear, and exactly what would happen to them if we coax them to fill these spaces.

And that’s where this world of fiction created by fans lives. Fanfiction is a huge, incomprehensible phenomenon, one which you won’t always find discussed in mainstream media. Fanfiction occupies an alternative space, one of the mainstream-yet-not popular culture, yet sees blooming trade. Within this framework, homosexual identities find assertion while different cultures are expressed. Ultimately, a huge popular network is organically built on stories that are considered ‘not suitable for the mainstream audiences.’

Fanfiction has had a profound impact on the way we view fiction and more importantly, texts in this real world. Since this fan-created content is so organic in nature, it is often very hard to notice the impact that it has within the fandoms as well. Within the Harry Potter fanfiction world,The Shoebox Project is a hugely influential fanfiction. It well-known for having set the foundation for how the Marauders will be viewed and written about for years to come. Fanfiction like The Shoebox Project allows the creation of fan-lore- a concept that is both beyond the author and yet, at the same time, so common a truth that it almost becomes canonical in its existence.

Without bombarding you with too many examples, let me explain what this means. Theories which are based within the framework of the canonical piece, yet at the same time never specifically stated are what become popular fan-lore. I’m going to try and use Harry Potter examples since they are the most well-known, but a very common example of fan-lore in action is seen in the fact that the Astronomy Tower has become something of a beacon of romantic shenanigans, a spot where the most make-outs take place. As a popular phenomenon, fanfiction has allowed the occurrence of the death of the author. With the existence of fanfiction, spaces of fiction are reclaimed by readers and the voice of God is lost. The idea that the author no longer has the final say in the characters or the story is not very new, however, technology has allowed pop culture to explode to a point where fans can create their own story through a collective imagination. This isn’t something that has been seen before, with the obvious exception of religion.

It allows us to open closed doors – because the story might have a solid reality, an existence driven by the author. However,at the same time, it can move beyond the author. The interaction with the story never ends, because everytime the readers write more headcanons, more fanfiction, more alternative universes- the story keeps changing with the characters.

The alternative space that fanfiction provides is interesting in the way it allows readers to express themselves. For instance, Fanfiction sees a wave of alternative sexualities – everything from homoerotica to asexual characters are depicted with a normalcy that one can never find in mainstream media. Fanfiction is alternative and extremely subversive in the way it opens this world for alternative identities to create themselves and define themselves within mainstream media. Tropes which are common within heterosexual romances find themselves in homosexual courtships, minor characters are expanded upon, claimed, and reimagined.

As a space of subversion, the power of fanfiction lies in its ability to create a fan-lore – an existence which is beyond the author, beyond the book, and yet, within the framework. As long as the story fits canon, there is no real proof of fanfiction having not happened – and hence, the story is almost certainly rewritten in these parameters. The most popular fan-lore, in fact, can also gain canonicity due to the effect they have on the author or on the way the book is viewed. Within the world of fanfiction, anything is a text – and, I think, that is the most important effect it has had on the way we view fiction.

Cheers,

T in a Cup


tanviedit

A Cup of T
‘T’ as in me, ‘Cup’ as in tea, ‘Of’ as in preposition and ‘A’ as in article. Bringing you thoughtful rants on TV, books, society and various other things induced by too many cups of ice tea.

Written by Tanvi
Updates every fortnight


Column icon by Sanna Jain
Featured Image by Kanishka

Manufacturing Memes

In a world of Peak TV and rising popular culture, communities enjoy a lot of in-jokes – those wisecracks that go viral simply due to their relatable nature . Memes, no matter how they are pronounced, are generally characterized by the universal nature of their likeableness. Their creation has become so intimately commonplace that they exist even within small communities – for instance, universities use them to market themselves, to make their publicity look a little less like publicity.

Let’s return to a bygone time, one of the Rage Comics, where Derp and Derpina reigned supreme. Essentially ,the time when seventh graders on Facebook had a handle on what was going to be meme-ified and what was not.

Look at the current memes, particularly those on a white background, with one image attached. Using current trends to establish something that will gain likes and laughter reiterates relatability. Memes are no longer merely funnythey are a marketing strategy attempting to give a more human picture to the corporation that uses them by using the best tools of the very millennial they wish to address. The idea behind this is simple: the perceived irreverence of the corporation in question makes them more real and accessible – perhaps a little less like a heartless machine that swallows people and spits them out according to profit and loss.

Regardless of the way humour is being used for these purposes, the essence of this “relatability” of memes is interesting in the way it operates. The meme is currently primarily used by the Liberals – Tumblr, a website which is known for tumbling into predominantly progressive views, after all, set the new format of the meme. Before Tumblr, during that dark period in human history from 2004 to 2008, memes were in the shape of Rage Comics, and type cast figures were used to indicate emotions. Tumblr text posts, which reached insane popularity, have set the standard for the current memes – the ones with a plain white background and relatable text in the middle.

This forced “relatability” isn’t meant to be good or bad – it’s a result of the way the meme culture has turned. Where it’s easier to approach target audiences by employing things they enjoy – such as memes – corporations have begun to use them for publicity. The beauty of this publicity is that you will never realise it’s publicity. The meme culture began as organically generated popular content – a democratic understanding of what should be considered good or bad. Instead of a bunch of aristocrats and elites telling you what to enjoy, the meme culture is one of the nicer, purer things that was started on the internet.

Nice things aren’t meant to last.

Healthy, home-grown and organic memes are a joke, of course. But here we are, corporately-generated memes trying to get the one thing that money had not been able to buy – the word-of-mouth review. Obviously, obviously we’re going to have someone else get their grimy little hands all over it and not realise what’s going on until all of us are laughing at a plain white text post of questionable font that says something relatable about the multinational chicken joint or something.

Naturally, the quality is going to drop. We can’t have good things for too long.

Cheers,

T in a Cup


tanviedit

A Cup of T
‘T’ as in me, ‘Cup’ as in tea, ‘Of’ as in preposition and ‘A’ as in article. Bringing you thoughtful rants on TV, books, society and various other things induced by too many cups of ice tea.

Written by Tanvi
Updates every fortnight


Column icon and featured image by Sanna Jain

The Domestic Orgasm

When you watch almost anything on TV, the slew of advertisements is a constant, unceasing stream; one that annoys you, makes you comment on how a voiceover about a lipstick isn’t actually going to help you sell a lipstick, and makes you think about how much you want to watch the show itself.

The standard template for advertisements for domestic products has stayed the same. Ever since war-ravaged society decided to sell canned foods like they were the bee’s knees, advertisements for domestic products have emphasized the way the product works, how it affects the family, and how oh-so helpful it ultimately is. Where colognes and clothes employ models to look like they want to sleep with you from the word go, domestic products sell you sex in a different way – as the nice, post marital, two-kids-and-a-white-picket-fence kind of sex.

There are strict domains for each gender, each age, and each thought that is related to domesticity. The women are involved in the sale of food products, in kitchenware, in cleaning clothes and basically in the Nirmas of the world. The men take decisions where electronics, travel and furniture are concerned.

The five-armed mother who can cook almost every South Indian dish for one breakfast is meant to make you want her to be your mother, and in the right age bracket – your wife. The idea of the modern mother is sold simplistically – she is the one who knows exactly how to clean the son’s dirty shirt with a “ma ke haath” type of wash in the washing machine, even when she goes to her office. She obviously has five arms, how else is she supposed to cook, clean, work, and rub off the spot of dirt from the kid’s uniform? Every time she chooses a particular cleaning detergent, she will smile and you will just know that this is the right detergent, the right moment, the right household, the right fakeness, the right everything.

The #feminist wife is the one who is the husband’s boss in office, gives him a deadline that forces him to stay at work late, and then comes home and cooks a magnificent meal of spaghetti and other generic delicious things for him. With her professionally cut short hair, pretty sarees and lack of sindoor, she fits right into the modern market. A woman who is the husband’s boss is obviously not going to be allowed the right to be represented with children. The male domain of ambition has to remain separate from the female one, if the kids are to be given a healthy upbringing.

Then there’s your father. The hyper-masculine figure wearing polo shirts and disarming smiles, who always knows about the perfect policy decision, market investment and energy-saving LED bulb (irrespective of mutual funds investment being subject to market risk, of course.).When he smiles at you, you know the house is going to function perfectly. The inverter won’t be using too much power, the fridge will have five stars, capitalism will bless your kids with the best tiffin boxes, and everyone will have good grades because the printer will be able to print high quality pictures for the children’s projects.

The model sanskari kid of every family is always the one who grows taller, stronger and sharper, top his class, and have popularity on his side as well. Young Chintu can’t be compared with Sharmaji’s son, he can beat Sharmaji’s son twice over. He’s the popular Complan boy with an organised study system and the ability to make his projects with the help of his mother.

On the other hand, the girl in pink dresses is the very symbol of innocence and adorableness. The perfect Indian family of nice, North Indian values ultimately features a girl who is studious, cares about her parents and is never seen playing with something like Hot-Wheels cars. She’s a perfect little angel, occasionally financially minded in the way she saves up change in her gulak (Read made in China piggy bank.) We trust poor quality products with finances very easily, you see. No wonder India’s economy is doing so well.

The whole point of an advertisement is to sell you something that is supposed to make you happy. You’re supposed to want that domestic life, need that professional touch to your home along with perfected emotional moments that make joy bubble out of Fantas and Cokes. You’re supposed to want to protect this image of your family, or this dream of your family – own a car, a home, a kitchen which functions very well etc. This is perfection on a plate – and you’re supposed to want it.

There is very little space left for those who don’t want to fit into this mould. For instance unmarried people are never shown, and women who pursue careers which involve travel are always shown in their twenties, before they “settle down.” The suburban perfection, after all, is what we are supposed to aspire for.

Cheers,

T in a Cup


tanviedit

A Cup of T
‘T’ as in me, ‘Cup’ as in tea, ‘Of’ as in preposition and ‘A’ as in article. Bringing you thoughtful rants on TV, books, society and various other things induced by too many cups of ice tea.

Written by Tanvi
Updates every fortnight


Column icon by Sanna Jain
Featured Image by Kanishka

The White Ideal Fantasy

Ideally, the story should end when the villain is killed and evil is vanquished with some other glamorous-sounding words which make the whole story ‘epic.’ That’s the way it should happen – such is the equation created by Tolkien, and Tolkienian lore is irreplaceable, as all of us are well aware.

The standard equation for  fantasy fiction, however, is not something that emerged when Tolkien decided that Frodo would take the ring to Mordor. The idea at the back of everyone’s head of a “knight-in-shining-armour”, who defeats a demonic other and returns home to reap rewards is an idea that has thoroughly pervaded the genre since its conception.

Reading The Chronicles of Narnia again might be the worst decision to make in your first semester as a second year. Everything, everything, absolutely everything is problematic. The Eurocentric idea of fantasy fiction is problematic in itself – the demonic other attacking a white society (almost always rural in existence. Think The Shire from the Hobbit homes) and the white heroes rising with heroism and magic to defeat it, is a standard trope.

The Chronicles of Narnia are even more problematic in the way this ‘other’ is constructed. The White Witch that features as the villain of The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe is a female with sexual agency, who uses magic to freeze the land in a permanent state of stagnancy and ‘ignores’ the laws of divinity. Conceptualised as Satan from the Biblical story of Genesis, the White Witch becomes the primary villain for Edmund, Lucy, Peter and Susan in their mission to protect a society of benevolent white humans overlooking a kingdom of talking animals.

However, despite being the sexualised and demonic feminine other, the White Witch still remains white. On the other hand, the way Lewis conceives of the Turks and Tarkans, as darker Asiatic heathens who believe in bestial Pagan Gods instead of the all-powerful Aslan is even more troublesome. The way fantasy is conceived is extremely Eurocentric – and rereading Narnia becomes something of a task in trying to understand exactly how privilege can help you ignore demographics, race, and gender almost entirely. The white society of Narnia is always supposedly perfect and the conflict only comes when evil is found in an external form.

I would not make the mistake of simplifying Tolkien into something as basic as a lot of white people fighting against the demonic orcs as there are many other complex ideas that he plays with and he does show the internal factionalism among dwarves, more among elves, and even more among humans. However, for some reason,  complex thoughts, ideology, adventure, and spirit seem to have been associated with a ‘white only’ phenomenon. White Eragon from The Inheritance Cycle will train Saphira and have internal revelations concerning good and evil (I digress, but I am still not sure how there were twelve oaths that Eragon and Saphira took. I’ve tried counting. It hasn’t worked. Please report to me if you have an answer, it’s been driving me crazy). Tolkien has created the immortal elves of ethereal white beauty while Robert Jordan has developed his Wheel of Time series where the sheer number of different kinds of whiteness will become uncontrollable.

Lewis’s conception of a white ideal society is rooted in the  idea that fantasy fiction emerged as a genre rooted in the  middle-ages of British society when many Arthurian legends prevailed. The story of Edmund, Peter, Susan and Lucy is one that uses many Christian symbols of stags, magic, Christmas, and Lions. Similarly, Shasta and Aravis have to protect the white Narnia of the North from the darker Southern prince, who is eventually turned into a donkey.

This white fantasy is amazing at ignoring the very conception of different races and colours. We are unable to associate people of colour with magic, or with the ability to assert an identity which does not entirely fit into the  ‘normal’. Hence, the gypsies in Lyra’s Oxford will be the ones who have dark skins. Even Harry Potter will try to sidestep the entire issue by not mentioning colour at all, while leaving no doubt in the reader’s mind about  the social strata and upper middle class nature of most of the characters, indicating their whiteness.

The rural-medieval theme of these books harks back to the  idea of a white society which was not riddled with the complexities of race, where  internal social troubles could be solved when there was a common enemy who had a different ‘savage’ body structure, or fit into an overarching idea about what exactly evil should be.

Isn’t that fun? Go re-read The Chronicles of Narnia. I dare you.

Cheers,

T in a Cup


tanviedit

A Cup of T
‘T’ as in me, ‘Cup’ as in tea, ‘Of’ as in preposition and ‘A’ as in article. Bringing you thoughtful rants on TV, books, society and various other things induced by too many cups of ice tea.

Written by Tanvi
Updates every fortnight


Column icon and featured image by Sanna Jain

The High School Heroine

Teenage romantic comedies have certainly come a long, long way without so much as tweaking the format a smidge. The Duff, released in 2015, is certainly very aware of the tropes that it’s rooted in, but nevertheless uses those tropes endlessly.

High school romantic comedies, in particular, seem to have a very explicit agenda in mind: showing you how a social outcast can find their place through the traditional make over, a rumour that gives them social acceptance, or a romance that makes them more desirable in a dog-eats-dog world of popularity. However, this idea of finding social acceptance through transforming yourself and eventually realizing, “I am perfect the way I am,” seems to be reserved for women. I know it’s a broad generalization to make, but Bianca Piper of The Duff appears to be facing many more esteem issues than Wesley Rush of the same movie does.

And when the male protagonist has anxiety issues about his position in the school social hierarchy, he doesn’t need to undergo a physical re-evaluation to be accepted into its highest echelons.

Bianca from The Duff is your typical high school heroine – she is average, funny, has quirky habits, and is in love with someone she can’t talk to due to crippling social anxiety. Not only is this image very common, it is very specific. For instance, Georgia Nicholson of Angus, Thongs and Perfect Snogging is characterized in a very similar way, though tending a lot more towards narcissism and melodrama. Likewise, The Breakfast Club is very particular in outlining the five categories that are the entire focus of high school movies – the Jocks, the Basketcases, the Criminals, the Prom Queens, and the Brains.

The quintessential element of a teenage rom-com is almost always a girl, generally aged fourteen to seventeen, who feels curiously out of place in a world of blonde-haired Barbies. The Duff is not different – it uses this stereotype to paint Bianca Piper the designated Ugly-Fat-Friend in her clique. However, the exploration of self-esteem in teenagers takes very different turns when the perspective changes from a female to a male one. The idea of naming the film after a social category considered typical of high school groups pokes fun at its origin, the people who are placed in it, and the audience that continues to enjoy such fare.

Since self-esteem (or lack thereof) among teenagers is a very important aspect of growing up, almost all teen-focused fiction has a lot to say about it. The young, plain-Jane, Bianca Pipers of the world resist conventional ideas of beauty by nestling instead into their own world of the quirky. But what a girl should do to be accepted in society follows another set of quite specific patterns. First, she needs to be a social outcast – or, preferably ignored. Second, the popular guy that everyone likes has to be her crush. ‘Bianca Pipers’, thus, will be in love with the ‘Toby Tuckers’ of the school – the blonde, blue-eyed boys who sing to their beloved. Dreamy is the word we are going for here. And, she will obviously be seeking help from an unconventional figure. In She’s All That, Lanie is helped into getting a grand “make-over,” by the school’s most popular boy, which is traditionally supposed to make him double back and stare at her in awe. In The Duff, this trope is intelligently subverted when, unexpectedly, the figure of the Jock decides to bring Bianca the right-sized bra.

High school romantic comedies also play a lot with the idea of traditional beauty – the blonde-and-awful Madison of The Duff is an archetypal figure found in just about every teenage movie. For instance, Mia Thermopolis in The Princess Diaries will wade through ‘princess-hood’ while heroically battling against the Queen Bee, Lana. Nobody really questions why someone at the bottom of the social hierarchy is even being noticed by someone at the top, but who cares? The high school heroine has to face such awfulness, you know.

Also, no film questions what happens to the high school heroine when she is at the top of the hierarchy. Well, none except Mean Girls, which not only shows you what happens to every girl looking for a makeover for social acceptance, but also portrays a culture of female against female, fighting for a common male prize. When Cady Heron becomes a part of the Queen Bee clique of Regina George, the movie exposes the hollowness of the inadequacy that teenage girls feel, along with the horrible culture that high school movies create – one based on competition for resources a.k.a. possessing the popular boy or the popular clique.

The qualities of the female who supposedly “deserves” the man in question are almost always her being socially awkward and untouched by other boys. It stems from a teenage social anxiety of not being popular enough, and troublingly demonstrates a Bianca Piper who has never been on a date being portrayed in a positive light as opposed to a Madison, who has dated a lot of people and is willing to date more.

For all intents and purposes, John Bender from The Breakfast Club doesn’t fit into school society any more than Bianca Piper of The Duff does. And eventually, the movie addresses this phenomenon, one which colours Katerina from 10 Things I Hate About You as a bitch because she doesn’t try to fit in, and bothers even less about what people think of her. There’s an interesting gendering of inadequacy, particularly in romantic comedies. The end result is always achieved via the tried, tested and basically exhausted route of the female undertaking a journey towards becoming a more confident and socially accepted version of herself, whereas the man does not have to go through the same. Bianca understands where the inadequacy comes from, realizes that not only is everyone a designated Ugly-Fat-Friend but that it’s not a bad place to be.

 

Cheers,

T in a Cup


tanviedit

A Cup of T
‘T’ as in me, ‘Cup’ as in tea, ‘Of’ as in preposition and ‘A’ as in article. Bringing you thoughtful rants on TV, books, society and various other things induced by too many cups of ice tea.

Written by Tanvi
Updates every fortnight


Column icon by Sanna Jain
Featured Image by Kanishka

Misrepresenting Menstruation

It should be considered funny that advertisements can make the bloodiest and most metallic part of the female into a celebration of flowers, pink, and ideas of femininity.

When I say misrepresentation of menstruation I don’t mean that advertisements tend to show women who do not seem to experience any pain, period (pun intended), I also mean the kind of female personalities that they choose to advertise their sanitary napkins. Unfortunately, I have no idea of how tampon advertisements go because in India, stuffing things up yourself is a taboo, whether it be for sex or for blood.

Sanitary napkin advertisements are one of two kinds: about either a woman who is troubled by the lack of sleep during periods, or about one who has major deadlines that she has to meet. As a parallel to the Indian Woman who handles office work along with her house work, the period inflicted female is either determined or troubled. Neither of these make sense because during your period, you don’t really think about whether you’re getting sleep because you’re not – period (pun intended, for the entire column).

For the sleepless female, the answer is always a pad which lasts all night and which allows for changing the slumbering/napping position as she likes. Let me tell sanitary napkin companies a little secret: we will wake up anyway and unless you make us a fully fledged diaper, we will not toss and turn. Isn’t the truth simple enough for you to swallow? Oh wait, you like us to be disturbed, don’t you? Menstruating females need to wake up at least once to check whether the blood has leaked anywhere and to check whether the so called pad of glory is continuing to withstand the onslaught of the battle.

This logic also stands for the pad that lasts the whole day and the woman in question who manages to go for a long walk.

Let me put this in terms that everybody can understand: as horrible as the pain is, as awful as the cramps are, as bloated as you feel during your period, you do not ignore what you do in your daily life because of the pain. If it is an unnecessary physical activity, then you do not do it in any case. If it is required and important, you will do it. Nobody has their period and happily goes for a long walk for no good reason. They go for a long walk because they need to go to the grocery store, or because they need something or because they feel bloated and need to do something about it.

Now, to our other menstruating heroine: the woman who is determined, who is ready, who is only accepting her period as a part of her femininity because she can obviously stop the period just by strongly saying ‘no.’ The woman who runs up and down the metro, despite her period – and does so with a smile. And never forget – she’s always wearing white and tight.

I know that people are barely aware of female biology, but on a day when relentless cramps and a bottom dripping blood cross all your limits of discomfort, you would not be wearing white skinny jeans. That just does not happen.

These advertisements are made to look like they are having sex with you: the practically orgasmic  Indian mother who just loves cooking for her family is made that way to make you think that she is your wife or your mother. Similarly, the period powered woman is made to look like she’s going to power through this while looking sexy – which makes no sense because periods just make you feel unsexy, personally speaking.

Periods don’t cripple us, but they also don’t make us happy about being able to beat them. When you are on your period, all you can feel is “Okay then,” along with the pain. Occasionally, it gets back-breakingly bad, and individual cases differ – so some people do have constant and unceasing pain, but most of us get through life just fine.

One would think that this wouldn’t be the case, since there is actual blood literally gushing out of a hole in your body but you just get used to it.

 

Cheers,

T in a Cup


tanviedit

A Cup of T
‘T’ as in me, ‘Cup’ as in tea, ‘Of’ as in preposition and ‘A’ as in article. Bringing you thoughtful rants on TV, books, society and various other things induced by too many cups of ice tea.

Written by Tanvi
Updates every fortnight


Column icon by Sanna Jain
Featured Image by Stuti Pachisia